Old Ad of the Week: Like a Klondike Lil

I read a lot of old newspapers, which means I see a lot of old ads. Some of them are too good to keep to myself.

Subtext: “Your friends aren’t tramps. I only holler at tramps.” Nice dude.


Source: The Baltimore Sun; Feb. 13, 1938

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Cora: Wheat and Chaff (11)

 

His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search. — The Merchant of Venice

When Cora Stallman’s inquest resumed on the last day of August 1925, it had been just three days since the last adjournment, but a full month since her death.

She had died at the zenith of summer; now, the people were looking toward fall. In Arcola, the broomcorn harvest was under way. Threshermen and hired hands were in high demand. The county fair was in two weeks. And for some, a new school year loomed.

Out on her sister’s farm, Cora’s cottage stood empty under the receding sun. When its screen door banged in a late summer wind, or the last swallows dipped between the porch pillars, she was no longer there to notice.

Cora was gone, but the business of her death remained unfinished. If the investigation itself were a tended crop, it too must be brought in for the year.

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Old Ad of the Week: That Wide-Awake Look

I read a lot of old newspapers, which means I see a lot of old ads. Some of them are too good to keep to myself.


Source: The San Francisco Examiner; May 4, 1941

 

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Old Ad of the Week: These Dreadful Hickies!

Hickies = Old term for pimples.

I read a lot of old newspapers, which means I see a lot of old ads. Some of them are too good to keep to myself.


Source: Chicago Tribune; Sept. 25, 1938

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Cora: The Party Line (10)

Thursday, Aug. 27, 1925. Coles County, IL

Untangling the events of Cora Stallman’s last day alive is no simple task.

The most obvious solution would be to get sheriff’s records or a transcript of the inquest testimony. Many years ago, I contacted the Coles County coroner’s office, hoping to do just that. The coroner himself was kind enough to search for me. Sadly, nearly all documents related to Cora’s case had disappeared in the intervening decades. “Sometimes the basement floods,” he said with some regret.

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Old Ad of the Week: Darn That Gogo Carsons!

I read a lot of old newspapers, which means I see a lot of old ads. Some of them are too good to keep to myself.


Source: Chicago Tribune; Sept. 25, 1938

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Cora: Until the Corn Grew Too High to See Them (9)

Thursday, Aug. 27, 1925. Humboldt, IL

On the first day of Cora Stallman’s inquest, Edith Lilley was in the witness chair twice. Both times she had plenty to tell — and yet, she hardly figures in the resulting newspaper accounts. Her testimony was mentioned only at the ends of articles, when it was mentioned at all. Maybe this oversight was due to when she testified, halfway through the event, after people had been sitting in the stuffy town hall for hours. Or maybe it was simpler than that. A farm wife, despite knowing Cora as a person and friend, could not compete against the allure of learned experts — even ones who knew her only as a body. The newspapers wanted to hear from doctors and scientists, so that’s who they put on the front page.

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