Cora: Anastasis (15)

Read the full Cora Stallman series here.


Anastasis: Noun, from Greek. 1. A recovery from a debilitating condition. 2. Rebirth. 3. Resurrection.

I wish I could tell you that Cora Stallman’s inquest led to a dramatic court case, full of more characters, searing accusations, and great and deep revelations about the people around her.

I don’t have a good ending to recount because, frankly, there wasn’t one. That’s not what Cora got in the end.

Continue reading “Cora: Anastasis (15)”

Old Ad of the Week: Million-Dollar Smile

“Red-headed dynamite, I calls her!”


I read a lot of old newspapers, which means I see a lot of old ads. Some of them are too good to keep to myself.

Source: Chicago Tribune; March 6, 1938

Right-click → view image to enlarge.

Cora: The Many Secret Things (14)

Read the full Cora Stallman series here.


Aug. 31, 1925. Humboldt, IL.

“…[I]t further developed that neither Mrs. Anna Seaman nor Tom Seaman, her husband, knew of the many secret things of Miss Stallman’s life.” — Mattoon Daily Journal-Gazette, Sept. 1, 1925

Late in the last hot afternoon of August 1925, Thomas Seaman stood up from the witness chair and signaled the end of testimony in Cora Stallman’s inquest. Thomas had provided his contradictory, flawed account. His wife Anna, Cora’s sister, had revealed as little as possible. Neighbors and friends told their own stories about the ex-teacher who amused their children and gave gifts unasked. This version of Cora, true and untrue, had all been committed to paper. And now it was done.

A crowd of 300 people waited anxiously for the verdict, peeking in the town hall windows and adjusting their chairs impatiently. But before Coroner Frank Schilling could hand the case to the inquest jury, he had one last matter to discuss.

Continue reading “Cora: The Many Secret Things (14)”

Old Ad of the Week: As Gay as a Schoolgirl

I guess being a woman isn’t tough — well, not too tough — after all!


I read a lot of old newspapers, which means I see a lot of old ads. Some of them are too good to keep to myself.

Source: Chicago Tribune; May 16, 1948

Right-click → view image to enlarge.

Two Snoops Are Better Than One

This week’s post was enhanced by the efforts of Graveyard Snoopette, my new volunteer helper extraordinaire.

When I started this project, I intended to stick to just online resources. However, there are cool things out there in the real world, and Snoopette has kindly offered to help dig them up.

She was willing to make two visits to the Jimmy Granato Jazz Archive, at the University of Chicago, on the slim chance that there was anything Hal-related there. And she found something!

Welcome Snoopette!

smokey stover band
Photo tracked down by my crafty assistant.

Unearthed: Hal Benson, Dr. Jazz

As always, it was the photos on the stone what got me. And the “Dixieland Jazz” inscription. And then the three keys embedded in its surface.

Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to figure out what the keys are about. If anyone from the Benson family shows up and would like to explain those, I would love to hear the reason for them.

Minor mystery aside, there’s still plenty to discuss when it comes to Hal Benson.

Continue reading “Unearthed: Hal Benson, Dr. Jazz”

Old Ad of the Week: Like Magic!

Before they invented installed cigarette lighters, there was this thing, which required you to pull a wire out of the dash.

Did you need that wire? Not as much as you need the Pres-a-Lite!


I read a lot of old newspapers, which means I see a lot of old ads. Some of them are too good to keep to myself.

Source: Chicago Tribune; Nov. 27, 1938

Right-click → view image to enlarge.