The Things You Find

From the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, March 13, 1910.
Rev. Shields was my great-grandfather. And Cermak was Cermak.
St__Louis_Post_Dispatch_Sun__Mar_13__1910_
St__Louis_Post_Dispatch_Sun__Mar_13__1910_B
And in case you wondered what a smartass looked like at the turn of the last century, we have this snip about women trying to get men to sign dry petitions.
St__Louis_Post_Dispatch_Sun__Mar_13__1910_-petitions

 


 

© 2019 Tori Brovet/All rights reserved

Ex Libris

Instead of writing a blog post this weekend, I spent far too much time listening to Adele and creating a photo album for a past vacation. I knew perfectly well that I was stalling. I was operating in the nostalgia I could handle, rather than the uncomfortable one that actually needed my attention.

Continue reading “Ex Libris”

Unearthed: The Inglis Family (Part 1)

This story truly spans the planet. To get to Japan from Chicago, we have to start in Scotland.

Pack a bag.

Continue reading “Unearthed: The Inglis Family (Part 1)”

Cora: Anastasis (15)

Read the full Cora Stallman series here.


Anastasis: Noun, from Greek. 1. A recovery from a debilitating condition. 2. Rebirth. 3. Resurrection.

I wish I could tell you that Cora Stallman’s inquest led to a dramatic court case, full of more characters, searing accusations, and great and deep revelations about the people around her.

I don’t have a good ending to recount because, frankly, there wasn’t one. That’s not what Cora got in the end.

Continue reading “Cora: Anastasis (15)”

Old Ad of the Week: Million-Dollar Smile

“Red-headed dynamite, I calls her!”


I read a lot of old newspapers, which means I see a lot of old ads. Some of them are too good to keep to myself.

Source: Chicago Tribune; March 6, 1938

Right-click → view image to enlarge.

Cora: The Many Secret Things (14)

Read the full Cora Stallman series here.


Aug. 31, 1925. Humboldt, IL.

“…[I]t further developed that neither Mrs. Anna Seaman nor Tom Seaman, her husband, knew of the many secret things of Miss Stallman’s life.” — Mattoon Daily Journal-Gazette, Sept. 1, 1925

Late in the last hot afternoon of August 1925, Thomas Seaman stood up from the witness chair and signaled the end of testimony in Cora Stallman’s inquest. Thomas had provided his contradictory, flawed account. His wife Anna, Cora’s sister, had revealed as little as possible. Neighbors and friends told their own stories about the ex-teacher who amused their children and gave gifts unasked. This version of Cora, true and untrue, had all been committed to paper. And now it was done.

A crowd of 300 people waited anxiously for the verdict, peeking in the town hall windows and adjusting their chairs impatiently. But before Coroner Frank Schilling could hand the case to the inquest jury, he had one last matter to discuss.

Continue reading “Cora: The Many Secret Things (14)”