Cora: The Rain and the Corn (8)

The wind and the corn talk things over together.
And the rain and the corn and the sun and the corn
Talk things over together. — Carl Sandburg

Aug. 10-27, 1925. Coles County, IL.

Coles County had rolled into the deepest part of summer, with days of 90 degrees or more.

The heat had to be endured — there was just too much to do. There were church picnics and family reunions, orchestra dances and club outings. At the tiny town of Dorans, about a mile west of Anna Seaman’s farm, a nightly tent revival meeting ran for two weeks. “Our services are short during the summer weather,” advertised the First Christian Church.

The electric fans never stopped rumbling.

So when the soaking rains came in the second week of August, it was what the people needed. It was as much rain as they had seen since March, 4 inches in about 5 days. Everything was wet. But it was good for the corn, so the people were happy. The water would carry the corn and broomcorn through to harvest. It might even be a great year.

It was, at least, something to discuss. About Cora Stallman there was little to say. She was no longer on the front page, as her case remained in limbo.

But newspapers still needed to be sold, and readers wanted answers….

The rest of this article is available at Medium.com.

© 2019 Tori Brovet/All rights reserved

Author: Ms. Snoop

ABOUT I was lucky to be born into a family of genealogists, and to be gifted a family tree already bristling with names. Along the way, other names have somehow found me. My job is to listen to their stories.

2 thoughts on “Cora: The Rain and the Corn (8)”

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